For a Peaceful Future without Nuclear Weapons and Wars

For a Peaceful Future without Nuclear Weapons and Wars

— On behalf of the A-Bomb Survivors in Japan —

Mikiso Iwasa

Funabashi City, Chiba Prefecture

 

May 2010

Dear friends,

I feel honored and pleased to be together with you, who have come to New York to achieve a successful outcome of the 2010 NPT Review Conference, and who are earnestly hoping and working for a world set free of the threat of nuclear weapons and nuclear war. Let us work together to abolish nuclear weapons without any further delay. Representing the Hibakusha, atomic bomb survivors of Japan, I have come here today to work for our common goal. Allow me to share with you my A-bomb experience and my appeal as a Hibakusha.

The atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6, 1945 and on August 9, 1945 respectively turned the two cities into rubble in instants through the enormous, combined destructive power of blast waves, heat rays, and radiation. The citizens there were thrown into infernos of fire and devastation contaminated with radioactivity.

At that time, I was a sixteen-year-old middle school student. As the factory at which I was mobilized to work was closed on that day due to a power shortage, I did not go to work. I was in the yard of my house, which was located 1.2 kilometers from what would be ground zero. Soon after I heard the roar of planes flying over, I felt the impact of a strong blast, and my body was smashed to the ground. I was not particularly injured, as the ground was soft soil. If I had stood about half a meter to the right, I might have been killed instantly, smashed on a garden rock. Miraculously, I suffered no burns, as I was in the shade of a neighbor’s house standing opposite mine across the street.

In the ominous silence, it suddenly dawned on me that my mother was under the collapsed house. I cried out, “Mom!” And I heard her reply, “I’m here,” from under the fallen roof. I was relieved to know that she was alive, but my joy was short-lived. When I managed to lift the roof sheet and to thrust my head under, I saw the fragments of the collapsed support pillars scattered over the foundation of the house. Through narrow slits between them, I saw my mother lying on her back about a meter away. She was bleeding from her closed eyes. “I cannot get in from here. Can you move out from there?” I asked. She said, “I cannot move unless you remove the beam lying on my left shoulder.” I tried to remove the debris, attacking it from another side, but I could not make my way any closer to her. After some time, a fierce firestorm approached, and I worked desperately in a shower of falling sparks. There was no one to help me. Feeling powerless, I became nearly frantic and cried, “Mom, there’s no way I can move it. The fire is coming. Can’t you make it through somehow?” I had no idea what was happening in Hiroshima beyond the confines of my collapsed house. My mother must have been full of fear, not able to see anything around her, trapped under the fallen house. But she seemed to have accepted death and said to me, “Then you must escape quickly!” And she began to recite a Buddhist prayer. Hearing her prayer, I ran away. I left my mother to be burnt alive in raging flames.

At that time, all around me was a sea of fire. I struggled through and managed to reach the swimming pool of a junior high school located behind our house. I jumped into the water and eventually escaped from the fire. But I saw a man, who was also trying to flee from the fire, reach the edge of the schoolyard a little later. He was enveloped in flames and burnt to death. Like him, many people were burnt to death after narrowly escaping their fallen houses. Losing their way in firestorms, they swarmed to a small water tank and died altogether. Similar dreadful scenes were seen everywhere in Hiroshima and Nagasaki right after the atomic bombings. It was literally a hell on earth.

A couple of days later, I dug out what looked like my mother’s body from the ruins of our house. It was a greasy and slimy object, like a mannequin painted with coal tar and burned. I could not believe that it was my mother’s body. She was killed mercilessly, not as a human being but as an object. The deaths of A-bomb victims in Hiroshima and Nagasaki could not possibly be described as human deaths.

My younger sister, then aged 12 and a first grader in a girls’ middle school, had been mobilized by the military and was working near ground zero when the bomb was dropped. To this day, she is still unaccounted for. We do not know where or how she died. As my father had died from an illness in May that year, I became an A-bomb orphan. Looking for my sister around the city center, I fell ill, suffering the acute symptoms of radiation poisoning. Scarlet spots developed all over my body. I could not swallow due to a sore throat. I bled from my nose and from my gums. I lost my hair. Thanks to the devoted care of my aunt, who lost her husband to the A-bomb, I survived. But since then, I have suffered many different illnesses and health conditions related to radiation poisoning. Recently, I developed cancer caused by the delayed effects of A-bomb radiation. I continue my Hibakusha activities while battling my cancer.

Please remember that my experience is only one of the several hundred thousand victims who went through the A-bombings. Not all of the Hibakusha were under the mushroom cloud. Many more people who later came into the city looking for their families or engaging in rescue work were also exposed to residual radiation, inhaling radioactive dust and air and drinking or eating contaminated water and food, irradiated not only externally but also internally. Even after sixty-five years, many Hibakusha still suffer from the dreadful consequences of the A-bombs, many worse off than I, but they still struggle to survive. We want to make sure that we stop repeating such atrocities. No one should have to experience such atrocities.

The harmful effects of nuclear weapons are not limited to the damage done to the bodies of their victims. Survivors continue to suffer in their everyday lives and from psychological wounds that will never heal as long as they live. Many of the Hibakusha have had chronic health problems, have lost family members, have experienced family break-ups, and have not been able to rebuild their lives, facing various kinds of social discrimination, giving up thoughts of marriage and children. In the cases of those who were exposed to the A-bombs in utero and were born with microcephaly, their parents continue to bear unimaginable burden and suffering, not only as Hibakusha themselves, but as parents of Hibakusha. While we know of many cases of second-generation A-bomb victims who have died from leukemia or cancers, the mechanism of the genetic effects of the A-bombs remains unstudied.

Thus, the A-bombs continue to inflict serious damage on the survivors to the extent that they are not allowed to die as human beings nor live as human beings. We, the Hibakusha, are living witnesses of one of the worst human disasters in history.

But we have never called for retaliation. The A-bomb damage was too grave and too destructive to consider retaliation. Instead, we have promoted our movement to ensure that such tragedies should not be repeated. We have worked to prevent nuclear war and to abolish nuclear weapons. We have also worked to achieve state compensation for the A-bomb damage. We speak about our A-bomb experiences both in Japan and internationally. We are confident that our activities have contributed to preventing the outbreak of nuclear war in a number of crises.

Now, we are at a very important juncture in our history.

On April 5, 2009, U.S. President Obama in his speech in Prague, Czech Republic, expressed his strong determination to achieve a “world without nuclear weapons”, acknowledging for the first time the moral responsibility of the country that has used nuclear weapons to act for that goal. We the Hibakusha pay tribute to him for his statement. We sincerely hope that during this NPT Review Conference his determination will be translated into real action. Discussions should start immediately to set out a concrete path for international negotiations for and realization of the abolition of nuclear weapons.

At the same time, we are aware of the significance of our own task. Currently, in the Main Gallery of the Visitors Lobby of the U.N. building, we are holding an A-bomb exhibition entitled “A Message to the World from Hiroshima and Nagasaki.” There, our delegation members are also giving witness to their atomic bomb experiences. Please come and visit our exhibition. We earnestly hope to achieve our goal of the elimination of nuclear weapons, and for this, we continue to work together with you. Thank you.

 

peacephilosophy.blogspot.com

 

2010年、ニューヨークにおける核不拡散条約再検討会議のときの岩佐さんの証言を、ここに紹介します。

核兵器も戦争もない平和な未来を

-日本の原爆被爆者を代表して-

岩佐幹三

千葉県船橋市

2010年NPT再検討会議の成功をめざして参集された皆さん、また、核兵器、核戦争の脅威から解き放たれることを心から願っている皆さん、核兵器の一日も早い廃絶のために力をあわせましょう。そのために日本から被爆者を代表して参加した一員として、私の被爆体験と願いを訴えます。

1945年8月6日と9日に広島と長崎に投下された原子爆弾は、爆風、熱線、放射線を総合した巨大な破壊的エネルギ-によって、一瞬のうちに両市を瓦礫の街に変え、市民たちを地獄の劫火と放射能の渦巻く汚染荒野の中に投げ込みました。

その日16歳の中学生だった私は、動員中の軍需工場が電休日だったので、広島の爆心から近距離1.2kmの自宅の庭にいました。飛行機の爆音が聞こえて間もなく、激しい爆風の衝撃をうけて、地面にたたきつけられました。やわらかい畑地だったので大した傷は負いませんでした。50cm右にいたら庭石にたたきつけられて即死だったでしょう。家の前のバス通りをはさんだ向かいの家の屋根の陰になって、奇跡的にやけども負いませんでした。

母が倒壊した家の下にいます。あたりの静寂をやぶって「お母さん」と叫びました。すると屋根の下から「ここよ」という声が聞こえてきました。「ああよかった。生きていてくれたんだ」とその瞬間は安堵しました。しかしその喜びも束の間でした。屋根板をはがして逆立ちをするよう顔を突っ込んだ目の前には、家のコンクリ-トの土台の上に大きな柱が重なって、行く手をはばんでいました。わずかな隙間から1mほど先に仰向けに倒れた母の姿が見えました。つむった目のあたりから血が流れていました。「こっちからはもう入れんから、そっちで動けないか」と聞くと、「左の肩の上を押さえている物をどけてくれんと動けんよ」という答えが返ってきました。また別の方から掘り始めましたが、仲々進みません。そのうちに爆風の吹き返しの火事嵐が物凄い勢いでで迫ってきました。火の粉がふりかかってきます。誰も助けてくれる人はなく、少年一人の力ではどうしたらよいかわかりません。気も動転してきました。とうとう「母さん。駄目だよ。火事の火が燃えついてきているよ。何とか動けんのか」と悲鳴をあげました。外にいる私だって何が起こったのかわからないのです。まして家の下敷きになって周りが見えない母は、不安というよりも恐怖心で一杯だったと思います。でも母は、死を覚悟したのか、「そんなら早よう逃げんさい」と言って、自分は「般若心経」(仏教)のお祈りを唱え始めました。私は、その声を聞きながら、生きたまま焼け死ぬ母を見殺しにして逃げたのです。

その時周りは、すでに火の海でした。私は、家の裏手にあった中学校の校庭のプ-ルにやっと辿りついて飛び込み、何とか助かることができました。少し遅れて逃げてきた人が、校庭の端まで到達しながら火ダルマになって焼け死ぬ姿を見ました。この人のように多くの被爆者が、倒れた家の中からやっとのことで這い出すことはできたものの、周りの猛火に逃げ場をうしなって、家の側に備えつけられていた小さな防火水槽で、寄り添って焼け死んでいったのです。広島と長崎のいたるところで、そのような惨状が繰り広げられました。この世の地獄としか言えない残虐なありさまでした。

数日後、私は、家の焼け跡から母の遺体らしいものを掘り出しました。それは、マネキン人形にコールタールを塗って焼いたような、油でヌルヌルする物体でした。とても母の死体とは思えませんでした。母は、人間としてではなく、モノとして殺されたのです。広島と長崎での被爆者たちの死は、「人間の死」といえるものではありませんでした。

女学校1年生(12歳)の妹は、軍の命令で爆心地近くに動員されて作業中に被爆しましたが、どこで死んだのか未だに行方不明です。その年の5月父を病気で失っていた私は、その日から原爆孤児になりました。その妹を探して広島市内を歩き回った私は、1カ月後に急性症状にかかって倒れました。身体中に赤紅色の斑点が生じ、喉の痛みでろくにものも飲み込めず、鼻や歯茎からは出血しました。髪の毛も抜けました。夫を原爆で失った叔母の必死の看病で奇跡的に死線を脱しましたが、その後もいろいろな疾病と健康障害を引き起こしました。原爆は、さらに牙をむいて襲いかかってきました。近年は晩発性放射能障害によるガンを発症して、闘病生活を続けながら、被爆者運動に参加しています。

私の被爆体験は、何十万人も被爆した中のほんの一例にしか過ぎません。私のように原爆のキノコ雲の下で直接被爆した者ばかりではありません。被爆した家族を探したり、救援のために入市したりした人々も、残留放射能にさらされ、放射能を帯びた塵やほこりを吸い込んだり、汚染された食べ物や水を摂取して、身体の外からだけでなく、身体の内部でも放射能による被曝をしたのです。被爆後65年経った今もなお多くの被爆者が、私以上にもっともっとひどい被害をうけて苦しみとたたかいながら、「ふたたび自分たちのような被害を繰り返させてはならない」と訴えて頑張って生きています。

原爆=核兵器被害は、このように被爆者の「いのち(からだ)」に対する被害だけではありません。「くらし」「こころ」についても被爆者は、苦悩に充ちた人生を一生背負い続けているのです。健康障害をかかえた上に家族を失い、家庭が崩壊したためにその後の人生の立て直しを全く狂わされた人、さまざまな社会的差別に苦しみ続けてきた人、被爆したために「結婚」や「出産」を諦めた人は少なくありません。また母親の胎内で被爆したために小頭症の状態で誕生した子供の場合は、親は自分だけでなく、その子の生涯についても想像を絶する負担と苦悩を背負い続けています。被爆2世の白血病や癌による死亡についての情報も多く寄せられていますが、遺伝的影響については未解明のままに残されています。

原爆は、このように被爆者に「人間として死ぬことも、人間らしく生きることも許さぬ」被害を与え続けています。私たち被爆者は、この人類史上最大の人災の生き証人です。

しかし私たちは、「報復」を主張したことはありません。報復を考えるには、その被害があまりにも甚大で破滅的だったからです。私たちは、報復ではなくて、「自分たちのような体験はもうたくさんだ」、「この苦しみを人類の上に二度と繰り返させぬ」ために「核戦争するな、核兵器なくせ」と核兵器の廃絶を訴え、原爆被害に対する国家補償の実現を求めて運動を進めてきました。私たちの国の内外にわたって、被爆体験を語り、核兵器廃絶を訴える運動の輪を大きく広げてきました。そして今日まで幾度か直面した核戦争の危機を防ぐことに貢献してきたと確信しています。

今人類は、非常に重要な状況に直面しています。

昨年4月5日、オバマ大統領は、チェコのプラハでの演説で、核兵器を使用したアメリカの大統領として初めて、その道義的責任を認めて、「核兵器のない世界」に向けた力強い決意を表明しました。私たち被爆者は、心から敬意を表します。オバマ大統領の決意が、このたびのNPT再検討会議で活かされて、核兵器廃絶に向けた国際的な協議の場の設定と実現のための具体的な道筋の討議が直ちに開始されることを期待します。同時に私たちに課せられた任務の重大さも自覚しています。私たちは、今、国連本部のメインギャラリーで、原爆展「ヒロシマ・ナガサキから世界へのメッセージ」の展示と代表団による被爆体験の証言活動を行なっています。一日も早く核兵器の廃絶が実現できることを切望し、ともに頑張りたいと思います。

 

Categories Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this:
search previous next tag category expand menu location phone mail time cart zoom edit close