Archive for May, 2016

Nuclear Experimentation Year 71: A Shadow On the Collective Consciousness

May 31, 2016
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By Ethan Indigo Smith

Contributing writer for Wake Up World

A Shadow On the Collective Consciousness

It has been a year since my annual nuclear-experimentation article. Time flies. My scale of time of course is ignorant. I cannot comprehend the complexity of time unfolding as it does, beyond my limited human imagination, and my ignorance of the ways of time is not unlike your own. And perhaps it is not unlike the ignorance of the nuclear goons of yesteryear, whose short-sighted planning for the nuclear waste ‘storage’ failed to take into account the life of nuclear radiation in human generations much less the millions of years that nuclear waste actually remains deadly.

Some people posit that one generation is roughly twenty years. So, about three generations ago the first nuclear waste was created and then buried, for future generations to deal with.

This month, as we begin Year 71 of the global nuclear experiment, the impermanence of the United States’ crumbling nuclear infrastructure is becoming blatantly apparent. Several nuclear sites are deteriorating, and there are increasing rates of illness around numerous nuclear sites in the USA and around the world — that we know of. But, as whole regions are suffering worsening nuclear conditions, we can only speculate about the total effect. We can only speculate about what we don’t know, and don’t actively measure.

Radioactive KarmaWhat we know of nuclear experimentation, and of time for that matter, reminds me of an old joke. Two sailors are looking over the ocean and one says to the other, ‘Gosh that’s a lot of water.’ The other sailor responds, ‘Yea, and that’s just the top of it.’ What we know of nuclear experimentation, I fear, is very much like this joke — what we know is just scratching the surface.

Of course, what the human collective is capable of comprehending about its place in time is also a lot like the silliness of the sailors observing the sea; when it comes to our understanding of space, time and causality — and therefore our effect on future generations — we’re just scratching the surface. When we look further, at a deeper level, life is like an ocean, an ocean of energy the Buddhists call Mara, made up of energy and karma. Some folks wiser than myself noted that karma might happen immediately, what we know as instant karma, and karma also might act like a bullet with infinite potential energy for its velocity, and this energy or bullet might take off out to Saturn before ricocheting back to Earth only to hit the grandchild of the person that fired it. Karma, you just never know.

Radiological contamination from nuclear experimentation is like karma. Nuclear contamination may zap you then and there, or it may come back to get your offspring. This understanding serves as a vital understanding of the nuclear experimentation situation in totality. Eventually the unprecedented environmental devastation we unleash every day the nuclear experiment continues, returns.

Below is a list of a few recent events of significance, that we know of — that we can see, as sailors on the sea of Mara.

Nuclear MadnessScientifically speaking, the risk cycle of nuclear power generation cannot be validated as “safe” until waste can be permanently removed, stored and degraded, and potential impacts to human and environmental health entirely mitigated. And we know that, today, that is simply not the case — despite the industry rhetoric. The nuclear-experimentation industry is still shrouded in scientific and political secrecy, undermining our liberties and democratic processes and risking our health and our very existence in the process. When it all goes wrong — and history shows us this outcome is inevitable — the environmental destruction both of nuclear accidents and planned detonations is global, and permanent.

Based on its track record it is apparent that the nuclear industry does not have the knowledge to properly assess and mitigate all the risks involved in their experiment — and it is an experiment — nor to safely manage the resulting nuclear waste for even 71 years of the one million years it takes to break down. How can utility companies, industry regulators and nuclear zeolots claim that an appropriate level of control is exercised on wastes that will be dangerously radioactive for tens of thousands of years? In reality, the storage cycle for weaponry and fuel-related nuclear waste is only beginning. We have reached year 71 of a million-year-long process. Our nuclear waste is a problem today, and is a mounting problem for countless generations yet to come.

And that’s just what we know about. With hindsight, it is undeniable that the nuclear industry obfuscates the truth. Spokespersons for GE, the corporation that built the faulty Fukushima reactors, describes nuclear energy as “the cleanest base-load power-generation system available today”, while news on the actual status of Fukushima (now 5 years on) is sketchy at best. The operators at Santa Susana laboratories didn’t advise those living downwind of the Santa Susana disaster that there might be something problematic in the air. Major fires went unreported, as did the 1959 meltdown. Only after a similar meltdown at Three Mile Island was the extent of the Santa Susana experiment finally revealed. (Source) And the recent near-miss at Miami never made the 6 o’clock news.

After many years of dedicated research and activism, I have realized that the nuclear experiment is among most important subjects left mostly unconsidered. Not only is the subject matter life-threatening beyond our comprehension, not only is it the result of the very military industrial complex President Eisenhower (the last military president to profoundly understood the military and government)publicly warned us about in 1961 — relegating the nuclear experimentation topic to the fringes of public focus and discussion casts a shadow on the collective consciousness.

But the cover-up is so great it exposes itself. Part of the cover-up, this grand shadow, is the minimizing of its importance. The discussion of nuclear experimentation has been made taboo, shrouded in false science and corporate agendas. But our unwillingness to confront the nuclear issue with any real seriousness exposes our civilization as being anything but civil. The nuclear experiment requires the light of our attention and care, but institutions of every variation — from the USA to North Korea, from the DOE to fisheries — all have reasons to casts a shadow on the collective consciousness and hinder genuine consideration of the effects of the nuclear experiment. They benefit from our silence and lack of attention to this matter of ultimate importance. And our radioactive karma is causing many of us to look the other way, as juveniles to consequences.

The only way for humanity to embrace truly clean-energy systems and overcome the threat of nuclear disaster is to wake up, get informed, and rise up. Let ignorance be the new taboo. Do not allow ostriches to pose as humans, their heads in the sand. As Year 71 of the Nuclear Experiment begins, and its trail of destruction becomes more apparent, we must continue to cast light on the shadows.

Peace.

http://www.amazon.com/Ethan/e/B0058V4P2U/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

About Ethan Indigo Smith:
Activist, author and Tai Chi teacher Ethan Indigo Smith was born on a farm in Maine and lived in Manhattan for a number of years before migrating west to Mendocino, California. Guided by a keen sense of integrity and humanity, Ethan’s work is both deeply connected and extremely insightful, blending philosophy, politics, activism, spirituality, meditation and a unique sense of humor.

The events of September 11, 2001 inspired him to write his first book, The Complete Patriot’s Guide to Oligarchical Collectivism, an insightful exploration of history, philosophy and contemporary politics. His more recent publications include:

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The Speech Obama Should Have Given in Hiroshima

May 30, 2016
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Barack Obama became the first U.S. President to visit Hiroshima on Friday, more than seven decades after the U.S. B-29 bomber Enola Gay dropped a 10,000-pound atomic bomb nicknamed “Little Boy” on the city whose military value was far less than that of Tampa to the United States. More than 70,000 people were instantly killed, and virtually the entire city was flattened. Many survivors would suffer prolonged and unimaginably painful aftereffects of radiation, which would cost at least 100,000 more people their lives. The effects of radiation would harm people for years and decades after the initial explosion.

Obama stood at a podium with the epicenter of the blast, the Genbaku Domu, in the background and said that he had “come to mourn the dead.” While Obama mourned, there was one thing he did not do: apologize.


He said that “death came from the sky.” No mention of why. Or who was responsible, as if it were a natural disaster rather than a crime perpetrated by actual people. Obama was either unwilling or unable to confront the truth and make amends.


Here’s what he could have said to try to do so
:

Seventy-one years ago, on a bright cloudless morning, an American warplane unleashed the most horrific and inhuman weapon ever invented, immediately imperiling the survival of the entire human species. This act of terrorism was the ultimate crime: a crime of mass murder, a crime of war, and a crime against humanity.

The victims, those who died incinerated in a flash, and those who died slowly and painfully over years from chemical poisoning, were never able to see justice served. Sadly, there is no way the criminals who carried out this heinous and barbaric act will ever face justice for their crimes.

I cannot change that. But, there is one thing I can do as the leader of the nation in whose name the bombing of Hiroshima was carried out: I can tell you, residents of Hiroshima and the rest of Japan, that I am sorry. I am sorry on behalf of my government and my country. I wish an American President would have come earlier and said this. This apology is decades overdue. It is a small and symbolic act, but it is necessary as a first step for true reconciliation.

A nuclear bomb should have never been dropped on Hiroshima. The most important goal of mankind should be to ensure that no nuclear bomb is ever dropped again. Anywhere in the world. Ever.

It would be easy to stand here and tell you that there are reasons why the American military and political officials chose to use a nuclear bomb. I could say it served a greater good of saving lives that would have been lost if the war had continued. I could say it was a decision made by people who were dealing with the pressure and horrors of fighting a war. But that would not be the truth. Those would be empty rationalizations. There is no justification for the bomb. Period.

The truth is that by August 6, 1945 Japan was defeated and had been seeking a conditional surrender for months. And American war planners knew this. They knew it because they had cracked the Japanese code and were intercepting their messages. [1]

Japan was willing to surrender under the condition that their Emperor, who was seen as a God among the Japanese people, be allowed to maintain his throne and not be prosecuted for war crimes. The Emperor himself called for “a plan to end the war” six weeks before the fateful day. [2] After so much unspeakable death and destruction, this reasonable offer should have been met with ecstatic celebration and relief.

Instead, U.S. officials disregarded it. They decided that it was necessary not just to defeat Japan, but to leave them utterly humiliated and disgraced. They wanted to demonstrate to their public that they could force another country to lay prostrate in front of them in complete submission. This is the mindset of terrorists, torturers, and sadists.

The United States joined with China and Great Britain to issue the Potsdam Declaration on July 26, in which they called on Japan “to proclaim now the unconditional surrender of all Japanese armed forces.” These were terms they understood Japan could not accept.

Unfortunately, the use of the atomic bomb had become inevitable after the massive investment of time and treasure represented by the Manhattan Project. Military planners worried about “the possibility that after spending huge amounts of money … the bomb would be a dud. They could easily imagine being grilled mercilessly by hostile members of Congress.”

Historian and former Nuclear Regulatory Commission employee J. Samuel Walkerconfirmed that aside from “shortening the war and saving American lives, Truman wanted to justify the expense and effort required to build the atomic bombs.”

That financial considerations and a self-interested desire for bureaucrats to validate themselves and protect their careers could lead to the single most destructive and cruel act in history is an abomination. It is a deep offense to the idea that people are innately moral, and it makes us ask how in a democratic society we can vest people with the authority to make decisions of such profound impact secretly and without accountability?

Walker notes that another consideration for using the bomb on Hiroshima was to put fear into the leaders of the Soviet Union and make them “more amenable to American wishes.” Just six weeks earlier the UN Charter had been established. It included the demand that “all members shall refrain in their international relations from the threat or use of force” against other states. The drafters of the treaty could never have imagined such an unconscionable violation of their words so soon after the monumental pact had been written.

As horrific as the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima was, it did not occur in a vacuum. What no one in mainstream American political discourse has so far been able to admit is that not only was there no justification for the bomb, there was little justification for the war against Japan in the first place.

The war was the result of the notion, which first emanated from the Council on Foreign Relations in 1941, that the U.S.’s “national interest” called for a “Grand Area” that consisted of the Western hemisphere, the British Empire and the Far East, while assuming the majority of Europe would be controlled by Nazi Germany. This was translated into a policy that demanded a military confrontation with Japan for control of the Far East. [3]

A pillar in this policy was an economic embargo against Japan. Cut off from imports and raw materials from the United States and Great Britain, Japan grew desperate and subsequently sought to expand its Empire. Japan saw itself in need of a sphere of influence involving the same areas in the Far East as the United States.The U.S. had several options to avoid war. For one, they could develop a program of agricultural and economic self-sufficiency which would allow them to insulate themselves from dependence on colonial powers, as well as allow them to steer clear of unpredictable and potentially hostile regions of the world.

But for businessmen who wanted to maintain control over the direction of the economy and keep their own fortunes growing at a limitless pace, this was a nonstarter. Instead, they were dedicated to challenging Japan. Hence, the embargo and the buildup for an inevitable military confrontation over Eastern Asia.

This is the background to Pearl Harbor. Japan was obviously not justified for attacking sovereign American territory in a blatant act of aggression. But we cannot pretend that it was not predictable or logical from their point of view.

Japan felt itself backed into a corner by the embargo. They felt they needed to expand further into Asia. They believed that if they did so, the U.S. military would have attacked them. They were right.

Both countries should have worked together to recognize each other’s perceived interests, deescalate, and achieve a mutually acceptable compromise. It is the ability to understand one’s perceived adversary as a rational counterpart, rather than an evil and irrational enemy, that separates humans from beasts. If we are not able to use this ability, we are no better than a predator seeking his prey.

The nuclear bombing of Hiroshima did not need to happen. But the bombing that took place on this site was just a symptom of the war it was part of. War will necessarily produce horrific crimes, some of which are unimaginable at the time they happen. As horrific as the nuclear bomb was, 70 years of technological advancements have made not just the destruction of an entire city, but of an entire country or continent within the realm of possibility.

We need to eliminate nuclear weapons from the earth. But that is not enough. Chemical weapons like napalm, Agent Orange, depleted uranium, and white phosphorous; biological weapons like Dengue bacteria and germ bombs; and conventional weapons like cluster bombs, pineapple bomblets, butterfly bombs and land mines are just some of the savage weapons used by the U.S. military alone in the years since the close of World War II to kill and maim millions of people. Many other countries possess similar weapons of mass destruction and have the capacity to do the same.

We need to eliminate war. All war. Forever. War is evil, plain and simple. We cannot undo the actions of the past. But we can let them guide us to a better world where we don’t repeat the horrors that the people of Hiroshima suffered here 71 years ago. That will be the only way to prevent the victims from having died in vain.

References

[1] Zinn, Howard. A People’s History of the United States: 1492-Present. New York: HarperCollins, 2003. pp. 423.

[2] U.S. Strategic Bombing Survey: The Effects of the Atomic Bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, June 19, 1946. President’s Secretary’s File, Truman Papers. click here

[3] Shoup, Laurence H. and William Minter. Imperial Brain Trust: The Council on Foreign Relations & United States Foreign Policy. Lincoln, NE: Authors Choice Press, 2004.

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Video: Ellsberg and Swanson on War and Peace  

May 29, 2016

David Swanson and Daniel Ellsberg at the San Francisco Public Library

Activist author David Swanson is joined by Daniel Ellsberg to present the brand new second edition of his influential work War Is A Lie.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6s2agOZgcrE&feature=youtu.be

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広島でのオバマは爆弾に平和サインを描く:Obama in Hiroshima Paints a Peace Sign on a Bomb

May 29, 2016
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President Obama went to Hiroshima, did not apologize, did not state the facts of the matter (that there was no justification for the bombings there and in Nagasaki), and did not announce any steps to reverse his pro-nuke policies (building more nukes, putting more nukes in Europe, defying the nonproliferation treaty, opposing a ban treaty, upholding a first-strike policy, spreading nuclear energy far and wide, demonizing Iran and North Korea, antagonizing Russia, etc.).

Where Obama is usually credited — and the reason he’s usually given a pass on his actual actions — is in the area of rhetoric. But in Hiroshima, as in Prague, his rhetoric did more harm than good. He claimed to want to eliminate nukes, but he declared that such a thing could not happen for decades (probably not in his lifetime) and he announced that humanity has always waged war (before later quietly claiming that this need not continue).

“Artifacts tell us that violent conflict appeared with the very first man. Our early ancestors having learned to make blades from flint and spears from wood used these tools not just for hunting but against their own kind,” said Obama.

“We may not be able to eliminate man’s capacity to do evil, so nations and the alliances that we form must possess the means to defend ourselves,” he added, leaping from a false claim about the past to a necessity to continue dumping our resources into the weapons that produce rather than avoid more wars.

After much in this higly damaging vein, Obama added: “But among those nations like my own that hold nuclear stockpiles, we must have the courage to escape the logic of fear and pursue a world without them. We may not realize this goal in my lifetime, but persistent effort can roll back the possibility of catastrophe.” He even said: “We’re not bound by genetic code to repeat the mistakes of the past. We can learn. We can choose. We can tell our children a different story. …” That’s right, but the U.S. President had already told a really bad one.

If war were inevitable, as Obama has repeatedly suggested, including in the first ever pro-war Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech, there would be little point in trying to end it. If war were inevitable, a moral case might be made for trying to lessen its damage while it continued. And numerous parochial cases could be made for being prepared to win inevitable wars for this side or that side. That’s the case Obama makes, without seeming to realize that it applies to other countries too, including countries that feel threatened by the U.S. military.

Developing ways to avoid generating conflicts is part of the answer to eliminating war, but some occurrence of conflict (or major disagreement) is inevitable, which is why we must use more effective and less destructive tools to resolve conflicts and to achieve security.
But there is nothing inevitable about war. It is not made necessary by our genes, by other inevitable forces in our culture, or by crises beyond our control.

War has only been around for the most recent fraction of the existence of our species. We did not evolve with it. During this most recent 10,000 years, war has been sporadic. Some societies have not known war. Some have known it and then abandoned it. Just as some of us find it hard to imagine a world without war or murder, some human societies have found it hard to imagine a world with those things. A man in Malaysia, asked why he wouldn’t shoot an arrow at slave raiders, replied “Because it would kill them.” He was unable to comprehend that anyone could choose to kill. It’s easy to suspect him of lacking imagination, but how easy is it for us to imagine a culture in which virtually nobody would ever choose to kill and war would be unknown? Whether easy or hard to imagine, or to create, this is decidedly a matter of culture and not of DNA.

According to myth, war is “natural.” Yet a great deal of conditioning is needed to prepare most people to take part in war, and a great deal of mental suffering is common among those who have taken part. In contrast, not a single person is known to have suffered deep moral regret or post-traumatic stress disorder from war deprivation.

In some societies women have been virtually excluded from war making for centuries and then included. Clearly, this is a question of culture, not of genetic makeup. War is optional, not inevitable, for women and men alike.

Some nations invest much more heavily in militarism than most and take part in many more wars. Some nations, under coercion, play minor parts in the wars of others. Some nations have completely abandoned war. Some have not attacked another country for centuries. Some have put their military in a museum. And even in the United States, 44% of the people tell pollsters that they “would” participate if there were a war, yet with the U.S. currently in 7 wars, less than 1% of the people are in the military.

War long predates capitalism, and surely Switzerland is a type of capitalist nation just as the United States is. But there is a widespread belief that a culture of capitalism — or of a particular type and degree of greed and destruction and short-sightedness — necessitates war. One answer to this concern is the following: any feature of a society that necessitates war can be changed and is not itself inevitable. The military-industrial complex is not an eternal and invincible force. Environmental destructiveness and economic structures based on greed are not immutable.

There is a sense in which this is unimportant; namely, we need to halt environmental destruction and reform corrupt government just as we need to end war, regardless of whether any of these changes depends on the others to succeed. Moreover, by uniting such campaigns into a comprehensive movement for change, strength in numbers will make each more likely to succeed.

But there is another sense in which this is important; namely, we need to understand war as the cultural creation that it is and stop imagining it as something imposed on us by forces beyond our control. In that sense it is important to recognize that no law of physics or sociology requires us to have war because we have some other institution. In fact, war is not required by a particular lifestyle or standard of living because any lifestyle can be changed, because unsustainable practices must end by definition with or without war, and because war actuallyimpoverishes societies that use it.

War in human history up to this point has not correlated with population density or resource scarcity. The idea that climate change and the resulting catastrophes will inevitably generate wars could be a self-fulfilling prophecy. It is not a prediction based on facts.

The growing and looming climate crisis is a good reason for us to outgrow our culture of war, so that we are prepared to handle crises by other, less destructive means. And redirecting some or all of the vast sums of money and energy that go into war and war preparation to the urgent work of protecting the climate could make a significant difference, both by ending one of our mostenvironmentally destructive activities and by funding a transition to sustainable practices.

In contrast, the mistaken belief that wars must follow climate chaos will encourage investment in military preparedness, thus exacerbating the climate crisis and making more likely the compounding of one type of catastrophe with another.

Human societies have been known to abolish institutions that were widely considered permanent. These have included human sacrifice, blood feuds, duelling, slavery, the death penalty, and many others. In some societies some of these practices have been largely eradicated, but remain illicitly in the shadows and on the margins. Those exceptions don’t tend to convince most people that complete eradication is impossible, only that it hasn’t yet been achieved in that society. The idea of eliminating hunger from the globe was once considered ludicrous. Now it is widely understood that hunger could be abolished — and for a tiny fraction of what is spent on war. While nuclear weapons have not all been dismantled and eliminated, there exists a popular movement working to do just that.

Ending all war is an idea that has found great acceptance in various times and places. It was more popular in the United States, for example, in the 1920s and 1930s. In recent decades, the notion has been propogated that war is permanent. That notion is new, radical, and without basis in fact.

Polling is not often done on support for the abolition of war. Here’s one case when it was done.

Quite a few nations have chosen to have no military. Here’s a list.

And here’s a movement to accomplish now what Obama discourages the world by claiming it can’t be done anytime soon. Those who say that such things cannot be done have always had and still have the responsibility to get out of the way of the people doing them.

LEARN MORE:

Video and Audio:

This video addresses the myth that humans are naturally violent: Book Discussion with Paul Chappell on The Art of Waging Peace.

This 1939 antiwar cartoon from MGM gives some indication of how mainstream opposition to war was at the time.

Doug Fry on Talk Nation Radio.

John Horgan on Talk Nation Radio.

An example of humans’ inclination away from war: the 1914 Christmas truce.

Films:

Joyeux Noel: a film about the 1914 Christmas truce.

Articles:

Fry, Douglas P. & Souillac, Genevieve (2013). The Relevance of Nomadic Forager Studies to Moral Foundations Theory: Moral Education and Global Ethics in the Twenty-First Century. Journal of Moral Education, (July) vol:xx-xx.

 

Henri Parens (2013) War Is Not Inevitable, Peace Review: A Journal of Social Justice, 25:2, 187-194.
Main arguments: Human civilization is at its best with universal education, affordable communication, and international travel as human connectors. War prevention is possible through support and fostering of human rights, securing of governments and institutions against abuses and exploitations by others, internationalization of children’s education, compulsory parenting education, and countering extremism of all kinds.Brooks, Allan Laurence. “Must war be inevitable? A general semantics essay.” ETC.: A Review of General Semantics 63.1 (2006): 86+. Academic OneFile. Web. 26 Dec. 2013.
Main arguments: Warns against two-valued positions: we are not either aggressive or non-aggressive. Points to the predominant mode of human cooperation throughout history. Arguments in line with many social and behavioral scientists who state that we have the potential to be aggressive and fight wars, but we also have the potential to be non-aggressive and peaceful.Zur, Ofer. (1989). War Myths: Exploration of the Dominant Collective Beliefs about Warfare. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 29(3), 297-327. doi: 10.1177/0022167889293002.
Main arguments: Author critically examines three myths about war: (1) war is part of human nature; (2) decent people are peaceful and seek to avoid war; (3) war is a male institution. Good point made: Disqualifying myths scientifically does not reduce their importance to the people and cultures subscribing to them. “Exposing the erroneous nature of these beliefs can be the first step out of the vicious cycle of destructive, unconscious self-fulfilling prophecies”.

Zur, Ofer. (1987). The Psychohistory of Warfare: The Co-Evolution of Culture, Psyche and Enemy. Journal of Peace Research, 24(2), 125-134. doi: 10.1177/002234338702400203.
Main arguments: Humans have had the technical and physical ability to create and use weapons against each other for the last 200,000 years, but only created and used weapons against each other in the last 13,000 years. Wars have been waged only one percent of human evolutionary time.

The Seville Statement on Violence: PDF.
World’s leading behavior scientists refute the notion that organized human violence [e.g. war] is biologically determined. The statement was adopted by the UNESCO.

War Can Be Ended: Part I of “War No More: The Case for Abolition” by David Swanson

Wars Are Not Unavoidable: Chapter 4 of “War Is A Lie” by David Swanson

On Ending War by E. Douglas Kihn

Books:

Beyond War: The Human Potential for Peace by Doug Fry

On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society by Dave Grossman

Peaceful Revolution by Paul K. Chappell

The End of War by John Horgan

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War Is A Lie by David Swanson

When the World Outlawed War by David Swanson

War No More: The Case for Abolition by David Swanson

A Future Without War: The Strategy of a Warfare Transition by Judith Hand

American Wars: Illusions and Realities by Paul Buchheit

The Imperial Cruise: A Secret History of Empire and War by James Bradley

Bury the Chains: Prophets and Rebels in the Fight to Free an Empire’s Slaves by Adam Hochschild

Fry, Douglas. P. (2013). War, peace, and human nature : the convergence of evolutionary and cultural views. New York: Oxford University Press.

Kemp, Graham, & Fry, Douglas P. (2004). Keeping the peace : conflict resolution and peaceful societies around the world. New York: Routledge.

 

http://davidswanson.org

The views expressed in this article are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.

Greg Palast: How the 2016 Election is being and will be stolen… and New Angles on Fukushima

May 29, 2016
Broadcast May 24, 2016

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Greg Palast Investigative reporter, formerly with Guardian and BBC, now with Rolling Stone

Rob: Great to have you back. What are you up to

Making a movie, Best Democracy money can buy, a tale of Billionaires and Ballot Bandits.

How Katherine Harris shoplifted the election for George W. Bush– by accusing black men of being ex cons.

Of 55,000 on the list, not one was a criminal.

Hunting up billionaires all over the globe buying up

knocking off minority voters. aim– to keep the senate for Republicans

Not only Republicans are stealing elections.

NY Democratic party– Hillaryistas– shoplifted a good hunk of the vote. In this case it was the King’s county Democratic party– Brooklyn– 125,000, half the number of votes counted, were blocked. Those people filled out an affidavit, in most states called a provisional ballot. It’s really a placebo ballot. They end up throwing them away.

The US keeps a count of no-counts. After 2000 they said you have a right to a ballot, but you don’t have a right to have it counted. According to US federal statistics, about 2.5 million ballots in any national election get thrown in the garbage.

There’s also purging– usually done by the Republicans–

But something very unusual happened– it happened to White folks.

End of voting rights act, in 2013, said that places with racial bias could not not

It applied to Kings county and it was under justice dept special scrutiny and could not have happened if the act was still in effect.

Arizona was republicans practicing for November. No long lines in highly contested republican primary.

Basically the Supreme court ordered the voting cops off the beat.

We estimate that about 5.9 million votes that have been flushed down the toilet in the last few elections.

new trick, out of Kansas, is going to take away a million votes.

Trump claims people are voting multiple times.

OVer past four years there have been about 2 billion votes cast and about three people have been caught.

These claims is always an excuse to stop mostly people of color from voting.

Interstate Cross Check

Interstate crosscheck. Kris Kobach, the Katherine Harris of 2016.

He’s the guy who wrote Arizona’s “driving while brown” SB 1070 law and Justice Department filed a criminal complaint against Sherriff Joe Arpaio, because the targets mostly vote blue.

Southern POverty law center calls Kobach a racists and supporter of hate groups.

Ann Coulter said that Kolbach should be Trumps running mate.

Thought 3 people have been convicted, they say that there are 7 million suspects.

Who’s on the list

John Jackson, John Black, David Lee, Jorge Rodriguez– people with common names of color.

if you get your name on this list as a suspected voter, you get a postcard that looks like junk mail. If you don’t return the card you lose the vote.

Seven million people under criminal investigation.

Only reason your would be on that list if there’s another voter in another state with the same first and last name in a different state.

So, middle name doesn’t matter. They don’t even know it and they’re

They’re going to knock off about a million voters.

They’ve knocked off 44,000 in VA already.

The Democratic officials in VA don’t even know it’s being done.

in NC they haven’t found one of the

Elmer Cross Barnes Jr. in NC,

There was another ELmer Barnes 3rd in Georgia

He didn’t vote once, so now, he won’t be able to vote in NC

OH, VA, NC and FL will be the states that determine the election.

And AZ should be a blue state, but they have been purging dark voters.

What about Karl Rove?

he’s getting about half a billion through American Crossroads.

I know Rove. He should be in prison. He’s in charge of the Republican vote suppression machinery.

He says Trump will not only lose but take the senate down with him.

We have a person who registers Republican

Rubio, OH, Ayotte”

Rove is saying the senate is in great danger.

Crosscheck knocks off Chunk, yuen, lee and Mohammed.

Rob: Who was behind Brooklyn?

King’s county machine– one of the great democratic machines.

In Brooklyn, it’s only Democrats, so it’s always Democrats they don’t like

That’s what they do, they knock off voters they don’t like and they were helping Hillary.

Most Americans don’t vote in midterm elections. If you didn’t vote before, you can lose your vote.

The Brooklyn machine, King County Dem party wanted to deliver for Hillary.

Exit polls showed their unadjusted numbers Bernie just lost by 4 percentage points. But the official count as 16%. Bernie was crushed and that knocked the wind out of his sails and donations were cut.

is there any hope for their

NY Public Interest Research group, headed by Neil Rosenstein, is filing a motion that all of those affidavit ballots will be counted and those people will be put back on the voter rolls.

I don’t think the ballots will be counted but I think the people will be put on the voter rolls.

Rob: Tell me about Fukushima

In NY I directed an investigation of nuclear plants, we found that guys who build nuclear plants lie. about the cost, about the safety.

Stone and Webster was found guilty of conspiracy, racketeering and fraud charges against.

I have the notebooks which say that the earthquake proofing had been faked.

In the case of Fukushima, one of the lies spread by the US media, like Anderson Cooper, was that no-one expected a 9.0 earthquake to hit Fukushima.

The nuclear plant a t Fukushima, was well under the tolerance Fukushima was supposed to handle.

All the emergency Diesel generators failed. Same used by all the plants– most are old cruise ship engines. They are supposed to snap on when there’s an accident. But cruise ships warm up their engines for h ours before torquing. So, when the Nuclear plants need the power, they have 12 seconds to fire up. So they fail. They know they will fail. They are like Xmas decorations.

There are some “greenies” who say we should resuscitate the Nuclear industry– like Obama.

Rob: So, Stone and Webster are the ones who built Fukushima.

They are literally rebuilding Fukushima, with a new name, Shaw Construction.

They are the problem. They are the danger.

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Rob Kall has spent his adult life as an awakener and empowerer– first in the field of biofeedback, inventing products, developing software and a music recording label, MuPsych, within the company he founded in 1978– Futurehealth, and founding, organizing and running 3 conferences: Winter Brain, on Neurofeedback and consciousness, Optimal Functioning and Positive Psychology (a pioneer in the field of Positive Psychology, first presenting workshops on it in 1985) and Storycon Summit Meeting on the Art Science and Application of Story– each the first of their kind.  Then, when he found the process of raising people’s consciousness and empowering them to take more control of their lives  one person at a time was too slow, he founded Opednews.com— which has been the top search result on Google for the terms liberal news and progressive opinion for several years. Rob began his Bottom-up Radio show, broadcast on WNJC 1360 AM to Metro Philly, also available on iTunes, covering the transition of our culture, business and world from predominantly Top-down (hierarchical, centralized, authoritarian, patriarchal, big)  to bottom-up (egalitarian, local, interdependent, grassroots, archetypal feminine and small.) Recent long-term projects include a book, Bottom-up– The Connection Revolution, debillionairizing the planet and the Psychopathy Defense and Optimization Project.

Rob Kall Wikipedia Page

Over 200 podcasts are archived for downloading here, or can be accessed from iTunes. Rob is also published regularly on theHuffingtonpost.com

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Full text of Obama’s speech at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park

May 28, 2016

U.S. President Barack Obama delivers a speech at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park on May 27, 2016. (Pool photo)

U.S. President Barack Obama visited Hiroshima on May 27, becoming the first sitting American president to do so after the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the city 71 years ago. After visiting the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, Obama laid a wreath before the cenotaph for A-bomb victims and made a speech at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park.

The full text of the speech follows:

***

Seventy-one years ago on a bright, cloudless morning, death fell from the sky and the world was changed. A flash of light and a wall of fire destroyed a city, and demonstrated that mankind possessed the means to destroy itself.

Why do we come to this place, to Hiroshima? We come to ponder a terrible force unleashed in the not-so-distant past. We come to mourn the dead, including over a hundred thousand Japanese men, women and children, thousands of Koreans, a dozen Americans held prisoner. Their souls speak to us, they ask us to look inward, to take stock of who we are and what we might become.

It is not the fact of war that sets Hiroshima apart. Artifacts tell us that violent conflict appeared with the very first man. Our early ancestors, having learned to make blades from flint, and spears from wood, used these tools not just for hunting, but against their own kind. On every continent, the history of civilization is filled with war, whether driven by scarcity of grain, or hunger for gold, compelled by nationalist fervor or religious zeal. Empires have risen and fallen. Peoples have been subjugated and liberated. And at each juncture, innocents have suffered — a countless toll, their names forgotten by time.

The world war that reached its brutal end in Hiroshima and Nagasaki was fought among the wealthiest and most powerful of nations. Their civilizations had given the world great cities, and magnificent art. Their thinkers had advanced ideas of justice and harmony and truth. And yet the war grew out of the same base instinct for domination or conquest that had caused conflicts among the simplest tribes — an old pattern amplified by new capabilities and without new constraints. In the span of a few years, some 60 million people would die: men, women, children, no different than us, shot, beaten, marched, bombed, jailed, starved, gassed to death.

There are many sites around the world that chronicle this war, memorials that tell stories of courage and heroism, graves and empty camps that echo of unspeakable depravity. Yet in the image of a mushroom cloud that rose into these skies we are most starkly reminded of humanity’s core contradiction — how the very spark that marks us as a species, our thoughts, our imagination, our language, our tool-making, our ability to set ourselves apart from nature and bend it to our will — those very things also give us the capacity for unmatched destruction.

How often does material advancement or social innovation blind us to this truth? How easily we learn to justify violence in the name of some higher cause. Every great religion promises a pathway to love and peace and righteousness. And yet no religion has been spared from believers who have claimed their faith is a license to kill.

Nations arise, telling a story that binds people together in sacrifice and cooperation, allowing for remarkable feats, but those same stories have so often been used to oppress and dehumanize those who are different.

Science allows us to communicate across the seas and fly above the clouds, to cure disease and understand the cosmos. But those same discoveries can be turned into ever more efficient killing machines.

The wars of the modern age teach us this truth. Hiroshima teaches this truth. Technological progress without an equivalent progress in human institutions can doom us. The scientific revolution that led to the splitting of an atom requires a moral revolution as well.

U.S. President Barack Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speak with the Atomic Bomb Dome seen at rear at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima on May 27, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

That is why we come to this place.

We stand here, in the middle of this city, and force ourselves to imagine the moment the bomb fell. We force ourselves to feel the dread of children confused by what they see. We listen to a silent cry. We remember all the innocents killed across the arc of that terrible war, and the wars that came before, and the wars that would follow. Mere words cannot give voice to such suffering. But we have a shared responsibility to look directly into the eye of history and ask what we must do differently to curb such suffering again.

Someday the voices of the hibakusha will no longer be with us to bear witness. But the memory of the morning of Aug. 6, 1945 must never fade. That memory allows us to fight complacency. It fuels our moral imagination. It allows us to change.

And since that fateful day, we have made choices that give us hope. The United States and Japan forged not only an alliance, but a friendship that has won far more for our people than we could ever claim through war.

The nations of Europe built a union that replaced battlefields with bonds of commerce and democracy. Oppressed peoples and nations won liberation. An international community established institutions and treaties that worked to avoid war, and aspired to restrict, and roll back, and ultimately eliminate the existence of nuclear weapons.

Still, every act of aggression between nations, every act of terror and corruption and cruelty and oppression that we see around the world shows our work is never done.

We may not be able to eliminate man’s capacity to do evil, so nations and the alliances that we formed must possess the means to defend ourselves. But among those nations like my own that hold nuclear stockpiles, we must have the courage to escape the logic of fear and pursue a world without them. We may not realize this goal in my lifetime. But persistent effort can roll back the possibility of catastrophe.

We can chart a course that leads to the destruction of these stockpiles. We can stop the spread to new nations and secure deadly materials from fanatics. And yet that is not enough. For we see around the world today how even the crudest rifles and barrel bombs can serve up violence on a terrible scale.

We must change our mindset about war itself — to prevent conflict through diplomacy, and strive to end conflicts after they’ve begun; to see our growing interdependence as a cause for peaceful cooperation, and not violent competition; to define our nations not by our capacity to destroy, but by what we build. And perhaps above all, we must reimagine our connection to one another as members of one human race — for this, too, is what makes our species unique. We’re not bound by genetic code to repeat the mistakes of the past. We can learn. We can choose. We can tell our children a different story, one that describes a common humanity, one that makes war less likely and cruelty less easily accepted.

We see these stories in the hibakusha: the woman who forgave a pilot who flew the plane that dropped the atomic bomb because she recognized that what she really hated was war itself; the man who sought out families of Americans killed here because he believed their loss was equal to his own.

U.S. President Barack Obama greets Shigeaki Mori, second from right, an atomic bomb survivor who created a memorial for American WWII POWs killed at Hiroshima, during a ceremony at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima on May 27, 2016. (AP Photo/Shuji Kajiyama)

My own nation’s story began with simple words: “All men are created equal and endowed by our Creator with certain unalienable rights, including life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” Realizing that ideal has never been easy, even within our own borders, even among our own citizens. But staying true to that story is worth the effort. It is an ideal to be strived for, an ideal that extends across continents and across oceans.

The irreducible worth of every person, the insistence that every life is precious, the radical and necessary notion that we are part of a single human family: That is the story that we all must tell.

That is why we come to Hiroshima, so that we might think of people we love, the first smile from our children in the morning, the gentle touch from a spouse over the kitchen table, the comforting embrace of a parent. We can think of those things and know that those same precious moments took place here, 71 years ago. Those who died, they are like us.

Ordinary people understand this, I think. They do not want more war. They would rather that the wonders of science be focused on improving life, and not eliminating it.

When the choices made by nations, when the choices made by leaders reflect this simple wisdom, then the lesson of Hiroshima is done.

The world was forever changed here. But today, the children of this city will go through their day in peace. What a precious thing that is. It is worth protecting, and then extending to every child.

That is the future we can choose, a future in which Hiroshima and Nagasaki are known not as the dawn of atomic warfare, but as the start of our own moral awakening.

投稿日: 2016年05月27日 19時45分 JST 更新: 3時間前
OBAMA

印刷

アメリカのオバマ大統領は5月27日、広島市の平和記念公園で原爆死没者慰霊碑に献花した。

オバマ氏は現職のアメリカ大統領として初めて被爆地・広島を訪問。原爆投下国として、広島と長崎を含む第二次世界大戦のすべての犠牲者らに哀悼の意を示すスピーチをした。その中で「核なき世界」を主導する責任についても言及した。

献花には安倍晋三首相が同席した。オバマ大統領のスピーチは以下のとおり。

■オバマ大統領「広島と長崎が教えてくれたのです」

71年前の明るく晴れ渡った朝、空から死神が舞い降り、世界は一変しました。閃光と炎の壁がこの街を破壊し、人類が自らを破滅に導く手段を手にしたことがはっきりと示されたのです。

なぜ私たちはここ、広島に来たのでしょうか?

私たちは、それほど遠くないある過去に恐ろしい力が解き放たれたことに思いをはせるため、ここにやって来ました。

私たちは、10万人を超える日本の男性、女性、そして子供、数多くの朝鮮の人々、12人のアメリカ人捕虜を含む死者を悼むため、ここにやって来ました。

彼らの魂が、私たちに語りかけています。彼らは、自分たちが一体何者なのか、そして自分たちがどうなったのかを振り返るため、内省するようにに求めています。

広島だけが際立って戦争という事実ではありません。遺物を見れば、暴力的な衝突は人類の歴史が始まった頃からあったことがわかります。フリント(編注・岩石の一種)から刃を、木から槍を作るようになった私たちの初期の祖先は、それらの道具を狩りのためだけでなく、自分たち人類に対しても使ったのです。

どの大陸でも、文明の歴史は戦争で満ちています。戦争は食糧不足、あるいは富への渇望から引き起こされ、民族主義者の熱狂や宗教的な熱意でやむなく起きてしまいます。

多くの帝国が勃興と衰退を繰り返しました。多くの人間が隷属と解放を繰り返しました。そして、それぞれの歴史の節目で、罪のない多くの人たちが、数えきれないほどの犠牲者を生んだこと、そして時が経つに連れて自分たちの名前が忘れ去られたことに苦しめられました。

広島と長崎で残酷な終焉へと行き着いた第二次世界大戦は、最も裕福で、もっとも強大な国家たちの間で戦われました。そうした国の文明は、世界に大都市と優れた芸術をもたらしました。そうした国の頭脳たちは、正義、調和、真実に関する先進的な思想を持っていました。にもかかわらず、支配欲あるいは征服欲といった衝動と同じ衝動から、戦争が生まれたのです。そのような衝動が、極めて単純な部族間同士の衝突を引き起こし、新たな能力によって増幅され、新たな制限のないお決まりのパターンを生んでしまったのです。

数年の間に、およそ6000万人もの人たちが亡くなりました。男性、女性、子供、私たちと何ら違いのない人たちがです。射殺され、撲殺され、行進させられて殺され、爆撃で殺され、獄中で殺され、餓死させられ、毒ガスで殺されました。世界中に、この戦争を記録する場所が数多くあります。それは勇気や勇敢な行動を綴った記念碑、言葉では言い表せないような卑劣な行為の名残でもある墓地や空っぽの収容所といったものです。

しかし、この空に立ち上ったキノコ雲の映像を見た時、私たちは人間の中核に矛盾があることを非常にくっきりとした形で思い起こすのです。

私たちの思考、想像力、言語、道具を作る能力、そして人間の本質と切り離して自分たちを定めたり、自分たちの意志に応じてそうした本質を曲げたりする能力といったものを私たちが人類として際立たせること――まさにそうしたことも類を見ない破滅をもたらすような能力を私たちに与えられることによって、どれだけ悲劇をもたらす誘発剤となってしまうか。

物質的な進歩、あるいは社会的な革新によって、どれだけ私たちはこうした真実が見えなくなってしまうのか。

より高い信念という名の下、どれだけ安易に私たちは暴力を正当化してしまうようになるのか。

どの偉大な宗教も、愛や平和、正義への道を約束します。にもかかわらず、信仰こそ殺人許可証であると主張する信者たちから免れられないのです。

国家は犠牲と協力で人々が団結するストーリーをこしらえ、優れた功績を認めるようになります。しかし、自分たちとは違う人々を抑圧し、人間性を奪うため、こうしたものと同様のストーリーが頻繁に利用されたのです。

科学によって、私たちは海を越えて交信したり雲の上を飛行したりできるようになり、あるいは病気を治したり宇宙を理解したりすることができるようになりました。しかし一方で、そうした発見はより効率的な殺人マシンへと変貌しうるのです。

現代の戦争が、こうした現実を教えてくれます。広島が、こうした現実を教えてくれます。

技術の進歩が、人間社会に同等の進歩をもたらさないのなら、私たち人間に破滅をもたらすこともあります。原子の分裂へとつながった科学的な変革には、道徳的な変革も求められます。

だからこそ、私たちはこの場所に来るのです。

私たちは、この街の中心に立ち、勇気を奮い起こして爆弾が投下された瞬間を想像します。

私たちは、目の当たりにしたものに混乱した子どもたちの恐怖に思いを馳せようとします。

私たちは、声なき叫び声に耳を傾けます。

私たちは、あの悲惨な戦争が、それ以前に起きた戦争が、それ以後に起きた戦争が進展していく中で殺されたすべての罪なき人々を追悼します。

言葉だけでは、こうした苦しみに言葉に表すことはできません。しかし私たちは、歴史を直視するために共同責任を負います。そして、こうした苦しみを二度と繰り返さないためにどうやってやり方を変えなければならないのかを自らに問わなければなりません。

いつの日か、証言する被爆者の声が私たちのもとに届かなくなるでしょう。しかし、1945年8月6日の朝の記憶を決して薄れさせてはなりません。その記憶があれば、私たちは現状肯定と戦えるのです。その記憶があれば、私たちの道徳的な想像力をかき立てるのです。その記憶があれば、変化できるのです。

あの運命の日以来、私たちは自らに希望をもたらす選択をしてきました。

アメリカと日本は同盟関係だけでなく、友好関係を構築しました。それは私たち人間が戦争を通じて獲得しうるものよりも、はるかに多くのものを勝ち取ったのです。

ヨーロッパ各国は、戦場を交易と民主主義の結びつきを深める場に置き換える連合を構築しました。抑圧された人々と国々は解放を勝ち取りました。国際社会は戦争を防ぎ、核兵器の存在を制限し、縮小し、究極的には廃絶するために機能する組織と条約をつくりました。

それでもなお、世界中で目にするあらゆる国家間の侵略行為、あらゆるテロ、そして腐敗と残虐行為、そして抑圧は、私たちのやることに終わりがないことを示しています。

私たちは、人間が邪悪な行いをする能力を根絶することはことはできないかもしれません。だから、国家や私たちが構築した同盟は、自らを守る手段を持たなければなりません。しかし、私の国のように核を保有する国々は、勇気を持って恐怖の論理から逃れ、核兵器なき世界を追求しなければなりません。

私が生きている間にこの目的は達成できないかもしれません。しかし、その可能性を追い求めていきたいと思います。このような破壊をもたらすような核兵器の保有を減らし、この「死の道具」が狂信的な者たちに渡らないようにしなくてはなりません。

それだけでは十分ではありません。世界では、原始的な道具であっても、非常に大きな破壊をもたらすことがあります。私たちの心を変えなくてはなりません。戦争に対する考え方を変える必要があります。紛争を外交的手段で解決することが必要です。紛争を終わらせる努力をしなければなりません。

平和的な協力をしていくことが重要です。暴力的な競争をするべきではありません。私たちは、築きあげていかなければなりません。破壊をしてはならないのです。なによりも、私たちは互いのつながりを再び認識する必要があります。同じ人類の一員としての繋がりを再び確認する必要があります。つながりこそが人類を独自のものにしています。

私たち人類は、過去で過ちを犯しましたが、その過去から学ぶことができます。選択をすることができます。子供達に対して、別の道もあるのだと語ることができます。

人類の共通性、戦争が起こらない世界、残虐性を容易く受け入れない世界を作っていくことができます。物語は、被爆者の方たちが語ってくださっています。原爆を落としたパイロットに会った女性がいました。殺されたそのアメリカ人の家族に会った人たちもいました。アメリカの犠牲も、日本の犠牲も、同じ意味を持っています

アメリカという国の物語は、簡単な言葉で始まります。すべての人類は平等である。そして、生まれもった権利がある。生命の自由、幸福を希求する権利です。しかし、それを現実のものとするのはアメリカ国内であっても、アメリカ人であっても決して簡単ではありません。

しかしその物語は、真実であるということが非常に重要です。努力を怠ってはならない理想であり、すべての国に必要なものです。すべての人がやっていくべきことです。すべての人命は、かけがえのないものです。私たちは「一つの家族の一部である」という考え方です。これこそが、私たちが伝えていかなくてはならない物語です。

だからこそ私たちは、広島に来たのです。そして、私たちが愛している人たちのことを考えます。たとえば、朝起きてすぐの子供達の笑顔、愛する人とのキッチンテーブルを挟んだ優しい触れ合い、両親からの優しい抱擁、そういった素晴らしい瞬間が71年前のこの場所にもあったのだということを考えることができます。

亡くなった方々は、私たちとの全く変わらない人たちです。多くの人々がそういったことが理解できると思います。もはやこれ以上、私たちは戦争は望んでいません。科学をもっと、人生を充実させることに使ってほしいと考えています。

国家や国家のリーダーが選択をするとき、また反省するとき、そのための知恵が広島から得られるでしょう。

世界はこの広島によって一変しました。しかし今日、広島の子供達は平和な日々を生きています。なんと貴重なことでしょうか。この生活は、守る価値があります。それを全ての子供達に広げていく必要があります。この未来こそ、私たちが選択する未来です。未来において広島と長崎は、核戦争の夜明けではなく、私たちの道義的な目覚めの地として知られることでしょう。

【追記 2016/5/28 9:40 訳文を修正しました】

【関連記事】

On President Obama’s Hiroshima Visit

May 28, 2016
Published on
by

President Obama lays a wreath on the Hiroshima Peace Memorial. (Photo: Suji Kajiyama/AP)

President Obama will be the first sitting U.S. president to visit Hiroshima since the bombing 71 years ago in 1945.

Japan seeks not an apology or reparation but an awareness and intimate connection to the common humanity we all share and that is at once threatened by the continued existence of nuclear weapons.

Any nation that continues to keep these weapons is not more secure or powerful but rather a bully ready to threaten others and indeed themselves.

“In Hiroshima, we don’t need another speech. We need a new nuclear weapons policy.”

Current scientific and medical research has drawn an even closer connection between nuclear war and catastrophic climate change. We now recognize that a small regional nuclear war for example between Pakistan and India using 100 Hiroshima size bombs and representing less than ½% of the global nuclear arsenals would put at risk the lives of 2 billion people on the planet from the global famine that would follow.

The weapons on a single U.S. Trident submarine can produce this same disaster. The U.S. has 14 of them, plus a fleet of land based missiles and strategic bombers.

The old adage of MAD for Mutually Assured Destruction is now better termed SAD for Self Assured Destruction as whomever would unleash such an attack would put their own people at risk from this climate change becoming defacto suicide bombers.

We must ignore the voices who continue to promote the myth of nuclear deterrence which in reality is the greatest driver of the arms race. They do so out of ignorance on the effects of these weapons, suicidal ideation or financial gain from the purveyors of these weapons of extinction.

The continued existence of these weapons comes at a heavy financial cost as well.  Currently we are spending $4 million dollars an hour on nuclear weapons and the Obama administration proposes the U.S. spend $1 trillion dollars over the next 30 years to pursue a second nuclear arms race which in turn will encourage the other nuclear powers to follow our lead and do likewise.  These current and proposed massive expenditures rob future generations of critical funds needed to address their basic needs including the threat of climate change.

It is important for President Obama to meet with Hibakusha, survivors of the attack and listen to what they are saying. For more than seven decades the Hibakusha have tried to make the world understand the full horror of what happened in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, to make sure that nuclear weapons are never used again. Like survivors of the Nazi Holocaust they have, over and over again, made themselves relive the most painful experiences imaginable in the hope that others will not have to suffer their fate. For decades nuclear armed states have talked about these weapons as though they were playing some abstract game of chess. The Hibakusha make flesh and blood the real nature of nuclear war.

President Obama came to office offering the vision of a world free of nuclear weapons, but since the successful negotiation of the New START treaty which was a major step in that direction, his administration has seemingly abandoned that goal.

The United States has refused to join the growing Open Ended Working Group of over 140 nations supporting a nuclear weapons ban treaty just as other weapons from chemical to biologic and land mines have been banned.

If the President is serious about seeking a world free of nuclear weapons, we must change course. We need to abandon the trillion dollar nuclear spending spree and embrace instead the international movement to eliminate nuclear weapons and the existential threat to human survival that they pose.

In Hiroshima, we don’t need another speech. We need a new nuclear weapons policy.

We have a choice – to continue down the path of a second nuclear arms race or to abide by our legal treaty obligations as required under Article VI of the Nuclear Non Proliferation Treaty and to move toward nuclear disarmament.

So, we the people implore you, Mr. President, as you process your experience, the choice is clear. You have the opportunity to make history. Choose life Mr. President. The world longs for your leadership on this issue. This is our prescription for survival.

Robert Dodge is a family physician practicing full time in Ventura, California. He serves on the board of Physicians for Social Responsibility Los Angeles serving as a Peace and Security Ambassador and at the national level where he sits on the security committee. He also serves on the board of the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation and Citizens for Peaceful Resolutions. He writes for PeaceVoice.

Today, in Hiroshima…

May 27, 2016
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Samantha Meyer, Global Zero globalzero@globalzero.org via mail.salsalabs.net 

8:42 AM (8 hours ago)

to me

Dear Friend,

Today President Obama made history by becoming the first sitting U.S. president to visit Hiroshima. At Peace Memorial Park, he once again brought the world’s attention to his vision — to “eliminate the existence of nuclear weapons.”

President Obama in Hiroshima
This is, in large part, due to the efforts of Global Zero members all around the world who stood up and demanded that our world leaders take bold action to eliminate nuclear weapons.

Just last week, we delivered tens of thousands of Global Zero petition signatures to White House officials, urging the president to make plans during his visit to stand down nuclear weapons on hair-trigger alert and prevent a disaster like Hiroshima from ever happening again.

Global Zero at the White House
Unfortunately, President Obama failed to announce any concrete plans during his speech this morning. Instead of using his historic visit as an opportunity to announce steps to reduce the threat posed by nuclear weapons, he gave us just another speech.

Simply making a speech about nuclear weapons is not enough.

We need rhetoric to be backed up with action, because the serious threat posed by nuclear weapons will not end until our leaders take steps to completely eliminate them.

The good news is that it can be done. In the last seven years alone, we’ve seen significant progress in this fight. Global Zero members have been there each step of the way — and we will continue to be there until we reach zero.

Thanks for all that you do.

Fight on,

Samantha Meyer
Deputy Campaign Director
Global Zero
P.S. Our movement is possible because of the thousands of donations we receive from supporters like you all over the world. If you would like to help support this effort, please consider making a small contribution to Global Zero so we can continue this fight to the end.

Global Zero is the international movement for the elimination of all nuclear weapons. Support the movement with a contribution here. Receiving emails is one of the best ways to stay up to date on our campaigns and actions. You can also like Global Zero on Facebook here and follow us on Twitter here. To stop receiving fundraising emails but stay on the Global Zero list, click here. If you really need to cut back, you can unsubscribe here. We’re sad to see you go!

Sent by GLOBAL ZERO | 1436 U Street NW, Suite 401 | Washington, DC 20009 USA

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Will You Join Me in Voting for Neither Trump Nor Clinton?

May 25, 2016

David Swanson via WarIsACrime.org david@davidswanson.org via sg.actionnetwork.org 

 

I’m committing to not vote for Clinton or Trump, and you can do the same.

The Democratic Party’s undemocratic primaries are not over, and nobody has won them. It is entirely possible that Hillary Clinton will not be nominated for any office. That doesn’t prevent us from going ahead and committing to never vote for either her or Donald Trump for president of the United States.

Making this commitment could send a badly needed message to the world: There are people in the United States with some minimal level of decency. It could also kickstart the movement that will be needed to resist the regime of whichever of them wins. It could also alert Californian Democrats to the need to vote for Bernie Sanders in the primary.

There’s a cartoon floating around at which a Muslim U.S. voter tries to choose between “Ban my relatives from entering country” and “Bomb the s— out of my relatives.” Not much of a choice, is it? Especially when the bomber is following the model of our current president with his record deportations, and the banner is a loose cannon who’s proposed to kill the families of designated enemies in the Middle East.

This is the essence of the problem. Whichever of these two you were to vote for, you’d get wars, nasty policies toward immigrants, plutocratic policies toward wealth, and destructive policies toward the natural environment — barring the arising of a powerful popular movement to bring the government under control.

Sure, one candidate is a comically ill-informed jackass who hates women, while the other is a woman whose comically jackassy policies will come with great scholarly volumns of ill information. But where does either of those really get us?

Lesser evilism predictably produces a pair of candidates each cycle who are both worse than was the more evil candidate last time. This cannot go on forever, and has already gone too far. We need a nonviolent movement to reform our election system — something not done through elections. But there are plenty of good candidates, such as Jill Stein, to check or write in. We should vote for those good candidates and get right back to work on improving the world.

Will you click here and join me?

Here are a few reminders of who the “progressive” candidate of the “Democratic” Party is:

“For this former Republican, and perhaps for others, the only choice will be to vote for Hillary Clinton. The party cannot be saved, but the country still can be.” —Robert Kagan

“I have a sense that she’s one of the more competent members of the current administration and it would be interesting to speculate about how she might perform were she to be president.” —Dick Cheney

“I’ve known her for many years now, and I respect her intellect. And she ran the State Department in the most effective way that I’ve ever seen.” —Henry Kissinger

Nobody Beats This Record

  • She says President Obama was wrong not to launch missile strikes on Syria in 2013.
  • She pushed hard for the overthrow of Qadaffi in 2011.
  • She supported the coup government in Honduras in 2009.
  • She has backed escalation and prolongation of war in Afghanistan.
  • She voted for the 2003 invasion of Iraq.
  • She skillfully promoted the White House justification for the war on Iraq.
  • She does not hesitate to back the use of drones for targeted killing.
  • She has consistently backed the military initiatives of Israel.
  • She was not ashamed to laugh at the killing of Qadaffi.
  • She has not hesitated to warn that she could obliterate Iran.
  • She is not afraid to antagonize Russia.
  • She helped facilitate a military coup in Ukraine.
  • She has the financial support of the arms makers and many of their foreign customers.
  • She waived restrictions at the State Department on selling weapons to Saudi Arabia, Algeria, Kuwait, United Arab Emirates, Oman, and Qatar, all states wise enough to donate to the Clinton Foundation.
  • She supported President Bill Clinton’s wars and the power of the president to make war without Congress.
  • She has advocated for arming fighters in Syria.
  • She supported a surge in Iraq even before President Bush did.

Help support DavidSwanson.org, WarIsACrime.org, and TalkNationRadio.org by clicking here:http://davidswanson.org/donate.

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Obama: Meet with Governor Onaga of Okinawa 文字サイズ: 小 中 大

May 25, 2016
CODEPINK

Rosan —

Crimes against Okinawans by U.S. military personnel — including sexual crimes and the recent murder of a young woman — and damage caused to the environment by the presence of U.S. military bases have been occurring for over 70 years. The U.S. has had a presence in Okinawa since the end of WWII and currently 33 U.S. military facilities and about 28,000 U.S. military personnel remain on the island. CODEPINKers in Japan, joined by Ann Wright, have protested the continuing U.S. military occupation of Okinawa; CODEPINK in DC has also recently held an action against the construction of a new base there.

Urge President Obama to meet Governor Onaga and address the crimes of U.S. personnel in Okinawa and the need to shut down U.S. military bases.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe hopes to use Henoko Bay, on the northeastern shore of Okinawa, to build a massive U.S. Marines base and a military port. Henoko, home to vibrant coral reefs, is filled with bio-diversity and is the home habitat for the endangered dugong, a cousin to the manatees. The plan to close Futenma Air Base, which is located in densely populated area in exchange for the U.S. base in Henoko, has been delayed until the year 2025. According to General Robert B. Neller, commandant of the Marine Corps, the delays were “partly due to demonstrators and a lack of support by the government of Okinawa.”

Between 70-90% of Okinawans oppose the U.S. military bases on the island. For many years, Okinawans have non-violently protested to end the military colonization imposed on them. From entering live-fire military exercise zones to forming human chains around military bases, they have made clear that the continual growth of militarization by both the Japanese and U.S. governments is harmful, unjust, and must be stopped.

President Obama’s statement that he would not use the opportunity of his visit to Hiroshima to apologize for the atomic bombing of Japan is deeply upsetting. However, it is not too late to encourage him to honor the request of Governor Onaga to meet with him in person to talk about the destructive U.S. bases in Okinawa.

Click here to read reactions to Obama’s upcoming trip from our CODEPINK Japanese sisters. CODEPINK Japan has been active for about a decade, working for peace by protesting the re-militarization of the Japanese constitution; by attending international women’s peace conferences; through participating in International Women’s Day celebrations; by visiting the CODEPINK house in Washington, DC, and many other actions.

We honor their dedication, and ask you to send a message to President Obama asking him to meet with Governor Onaga.

Peace,
Alice, Janet, and your CODEPINK Team

P.S. Check out our new Stop Military Bases campaign page and get involved!

Donate Now

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