Archive for the ‘No nukes’ Category

UN Panel: Renewables, Not Nukes, Can Solve Climate Crisis

April 21, 2014

The wind, sun, and biomass are three renewable energy sources. (photo: WikiCommons)
The wind, sun, and biomass are three renewable energy sources. (photo: WikiCommons)

By Harvey Wasserman, Common Dreams

20 April 14

 

he authoritative Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has left zero doubt that we humans are wrecking our climate.

It also effectively says the problem can be solved, and that renewable energy is the way to do it, and that nuclear power is not.

The United Nations’ IPCC is the world’s most respected authority on climate.

This IPCC report was four years in the making.  It embraces several hundred climate scientists and more than a thousand computerized scenarios of what might be happening to global weather patterns.

The panel’s work has definitively discredited the corporate contention that human-made carbon emissions are not affecting climate change.  To avoid total catastrophe, says the IPCC, we must reduce the industrial spew of global warming gasses by 40-70 percent of 2010 levels.

Though the warning is dire, the report offers three pieces of good news.

First, we have about 15 years to slash these emissions.

Second, renewable technologies are available to do the job.

And third, the cost is manageable.

Though 2030 might seem a tight deadline for a definitive transition to Solartopia, green power technologies have become far simpler and quicker to install than their competitors, especially atomic reactors. They are also far cheaper, and we have the capital to do it.

The fossil fuel industry has long scorned the idea that its emissions are disrupting our Earth’s weather.

The oil companies and atomic reactor backers have dismissed the ability of renewables to provide humankind’s energy needs.

But the IPCC confirms that green technologies, including efficiency and conservation, can in fact handle the job—at a manageable price.

“It doesn’t cost the world to save the planet,” says Professor Ottmar Edenhofer, an economist who led the IPCC team.

The IPCC report cites nuclear power as a possible means of lowering industrial carbon emissions. But it also underscores considerable barriers involving finance and public opposition.  Joined with widespread concerns about ecological impacts, length of implementation, production uncertainties and unsolved waste issues, the report’s positive emphasis on renewables virtually guarantees nuclear’s irrelevance.

Some climate scientists have recently advocated atomic energy as a solution to global warming.  But their most prominent spokesman, Dr. James Hansen, also expresses serious doubts about the current generation of reactors, including Fukushima, which he calls “that old technology.”

Instead Hansen advocates a new generation of reactors.

But the designs are untested, with implementation schedules stretching out for decades.  Financing is a major obstacle as is waste disposal and widespread public opposition, now certain to escalate with the IPCC’s confirmation that renewables can provide the power so much cheaper and faster.

With its 15-year deadline for massive carbon reductions the IPCC has effectively timed out any chance a new generation of reactors could help.

And with its clear endorsement of green power as a tangible, doable, affordable solution for the climate crisis, the pro-nuke case has clearly suffered a multiple meltdown.

With green power, says IPCC co-chair Jim Skea, a British professor, a renewable solution is at hand. “It’s actually affordable to do it and people are not going to have to sacrifice their aspirations about improved standards of living.”

 

UN PANEL: RENEWABLES, NOT NUKES, CAN SOLVE CLIMATE CRISIS

April 17, 2014

UN PANEL CONFIRMS RENEWABLES, NOT NUKES, CAN SOLVE CLIMATE CRISIS

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Harvey Wasserman, The World Community Must Take Charge at Fukushima Campaign noreply@list.moveon.org

2:32 AM (12 hours ago)

to me

 

 

By Harvey Wasserman

 

The authoritative Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has left zero doubt that we humans are wrecking our climate.

It also effectively says the problem can be solved, and that renewable energy is the way to do it, and that nuclear power is not.

 

To read the rest of the story, please go to:

http://progressive.org/content/un-panel-renewables-not-nukes-can-solve-climate-crisis

 

 

No Nuke Export

April 14, 2014


★☆★☆★☆★ ENGLISH ★☆★☆★☆★

PARLIAMENT SITTING & RALLY on 4/15
against the ratification of a Japanese nuclear agreement with Turkey and the
United Arab Emirates

Exporting nuclear power is an aggression -
Let’s block the agreement at the House of Councillors’ Committee !
Time:  April 15th (Tue) 2 to 8pm (rally from 6pm)
Place:  in front of the Members’ Office Building of the House of Councillors
(Access)
http://bb-building.net/tokyo/deta/457.html


◆ Initiative of: ANTITEPCO ACTION !
BLOG:
http://antitepco.ldblog.jp/
TWIT:https://twitter.com/antitepco1
MAIL:antitepco1@yahoo.co.jp


A nuclear agreement allowing Japan to export its nuclear technologies to
Turkey and the United Arab Emirates was just voted the House
of Representatives of the Japanese Parliament. This is the first agreement
on nuclear exportations signed by Japan since the Fukushima nuclear
accident.
The ruling party will deliberate upon this agreement on April 15th, and will
aim to ratify it within the same week.

We already held protests on April 10th & 11th in front of the Members’
Office buildings of the Parliament.
http://antitepco.ldblog.jp/archives/37389755.html
In Turkey, the movement opposing nuclear power is still ongoing against the
severely repressive goverment, and it is the responsibility of Japanese
people to prevent our Prime Minister Abe’s goverment from exporting and
spreading nuclear power throughout the world.

This is why we plan a long run sitting and rally in front of the House of
Councillors on the expected date of deliberation.

At the same time, we ask the government to cancel its new energy plan, to
withdraw from its plan of nuclear fuel recycling (e.g. Shimokita treatment
plant), and to give up the reactivation of any japanese nuclear power plants
(e.g. Sendai nuclear power plant).

We look forward to seeing you!

 

Call by the Ant-TEPCO

 

 

Julie Bishop out of touch on nuclear weapons ban

April 12, 2014
ICAN MEDIA RELEASE
April 11, 2014
 
MELBOURNE – With Foreign Minister Julie Bishop participating in high-level talks today [Friday] on nuclear disarmament in Hiroshima, the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) has released a poll revealing 84% of Australians want the government to support efforts for a global treaty banning nuclear weapons.

Hiroshima is one of two cities destroyed by nuclear bombs in World War II. More than 140,000 of its inhabitants were killed instantly or within months of the US attack almost 70 years ago. Ms Bishop has so far been unwilling to support calls for a treaty banning nuclear weapons, arguing it would be incompatible with Australia’s continued reliance on US nuclear weapons in its defence.

The nationwide Nielsen poll of 1,500 Australians, commissioned by ICAN, posed the question: “Should the Australian government support or oppose the current efforts for a global treaty banning nuclear weapons?” 84% of respondents said “support”, while only 3% agreed with the current government approach of opposing such efforts, revealing that Ms Bishop and the Australian government are out of touch with Australian public opinion.

“The government must stand on the right side of history and support negotiations for a global ban on nuclear weapons,” said Dr Tilman Ruff, an expert on the health impact of nuclear weapons and a co-chair of ICAN, who is in Hiroshima for the meeting. “There is an urgent public health imperative to outlaw and eliminate nuclear weapons before they are ever used again.”

Nuclear weapons are the only weapons of mass destruction not yet clearly prohibited by an international convention. More than 150 nations have called for negotiations on a nuclear weapons ban to commence without further delay. The global Red Cross and Red Crescent movement and UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon have also voiced their support.

Japanese foreign minister Fumio Kishida will host today’s meeting in Hiroshima as part of the Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Initiative (NPDI), a cross-regional group of nations led by Australia and Japan. It is expected to include high-level representatives from Germany, the Netherlands, Poland, Canada, Mexico, Chile, Turkey, the United Arab Emirates, Nigeria, the Philippines, Indonesia and the US.

Interviews available with:
Dr Tilman Ruff (+61 438 099 231) (in Hiroshima)
Tim Wright (+61 400 967 233) (in Melbourne)

Details about the meeting:
http://www.mofa.go.jp/dns/inec/page22e_000339.html

Poll results:
http://www.icanw.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/NielsenPoll.pdf

Accompanying photo:
Lanterns in Hiroshima (Source: ICAN)
http://www.icanw.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/HiroshimaLanterns.jpg

International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons
PO Box 1379, Carlton VIC 3053, Australia

m +61(0)400 967 233

 
——————— Original Message Ends ——————–

Bloomberg: Fukushima a global disaster with huge environmental consequences… like all nuclear catastrophes — UC Berkeley Nuclear Expert: There’s ‘clear and obvious’ consequences from radiation release… citizens should be prepared… ‘cold truth’ is accidents will always occur

April 10, 2014

Latest Headlines from ENENews


TV: “Far more serious than Feds letting on” at US nuclear site — Many workers in much worse shape than reported — Week-long nosebleeds, intense headaches, shaking, burning lungs, vomiting — Worker: Now I’m worried… yesterday worst day so far… may go on rest of my life (VIDEO)

Posted: 09 Apr 2014 11:02 PM PDT

Navy Sailors: Frozen Fukushima steam blanketed ship; Crew suffered massive radiation doses, dozens have cancer — Calls for it to be sunk… still too radioactive; Navy: There’s some contamination, but it’s ok — Tepco: No way US officials would rely on information we were telling to public

Posted: 09 Apr 2014 02:49 PM PDT

Bloomberg: Fukushima a global disaster with huge environmental consequences… like all nuclear catastrophes — UC Berkeley Nuclear Expert: There’s ‘clear and obvious’ consequences from radiation release… citizens should be prepared… ‘cold truth’ is accidents will always occur

Posted: 09 Apr 2014 09:10 AM PDT

AP: Fukushima children flee radiation; “Getting nosebleeds, growing pale and lethargic”; Mistrust of officials high — Father: “Cases of cancer are up… we are worried” — Mother: I don’t believe it’s as safe as gov’t claims, raising questions can get you branded a troublemaker

Posted: 09 Apr 2014 07:36 AM PDT

Fighting Our Fossil-Nuke Extinction  

April 9, 2014

By Harvey Wasserman

 

Shutterstock

The 25th anniversary of the Exxon Valdez disaster has brought critical new evidence that petro-pollution is destroying our global ecosystem.

The third anniversary of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear meltdown in Japan confirms that radioactive reactor fallout is doing the same.

How the two mega-poisons interact remains largely unstudied, but the answers can’t be good. And it’s clearer than ever that we won’t survive without ridding our planet of both.

To oppose atomic power with fossil fuels is to treat cancer by burning down the house.

To oppose petro-pollution with nukes is to stoke that fire with radiation. …..
READ MORE AT :
http://www.truthdig.com/report/item/fighting_our_fossil-nuke_extinction_20140408

 

Noam Chomsky: ‘Eliminate All Nuclear Weapons’

April 6, 2014

Prof. Noam Chomsky, linguist, philosopher, cognitive scientist and activist. (photo: Va Shiva)
Prof. Noam Chomsky, linguist, philosopher, cognitive scientist and activist. (photo: Va Shiva)

By Jane Ayers, Reader Supported News

05 April 14

 

Professor Noam Chomsky, the world-renowned political theorist and Professor Emeritus of Linguistics at MIT, recently delivered the prestigious Nuclear Age Peace Foundation’s (NAPF) 13th Annual Frank K. Kelly Lecture on Humanity’s Future. His lecture, entitled “Security and State Policy” was delivered to a capacity audience at the Lobero Theatre in Santa Barbara, California on February 28th. After his lecture, Chomsky was also presented the foundation’s Lifetime Achievement Award.

David Krieger, President of NAPF, stated, “He is one of the world’s wise men. The depth of his knowledge about the complex and varied crises that confront humanity is more than impressive. He is a truth teller to those in power, to other intellectuals, and to the people of the world.” Professor Chomsky has recently joined the Advisory Council of NAPF, which also includes members Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Jane Goodall, Queen Noor of Jordan, Daniel Ellsberg, Bianca Jagger, and H.H. the Dalai Lama.

In his lecture Chomsky pointed out, “It is hard to contest the conclusion of the last commander of the Strategic Air Command, General Lee Butler, that we have so far survived the nuclear age by some combination of skill, luck, and divine intervention, and I suspect the latter in greatest proportion.”

For a full transcript of his Frank K. Kelly lecture, go to NAPF:http://www.wagingpeace.org/security-and-state-policy 

Before Prof. Chomsky’s lecture, I conducted a phone interview with him in which he addressed some of today’s important nuclear issues

~ Jane Ayers

: General Lee Butler, the former commander in chief of the Strategic Air Command, retired his post in 1996, calling for the worldwide abolition of nuclear weapons. I interviewed him at the time, and he emphasized his concern about the fragility of the world’s nuclear first alert systems, and especially with Russia. At that time he called for total abolition of nuclear weapons, yet now years later promotes a responsible global reduction of nuclear dangers. Are you concerned about the fragility of the first alert systems?

Chomsky: Yes, he also pointed out that the 1960 U.S. Nuclear War plan, called the Single Integrated Operational Plan (SIOP), was the most outrageous document in human history, except perhaps for the Russian counterpart, which we knew nothing about. This U.S. nuclear war plan, if our first alert system had alerted a Soviet strike, would have delivered 3200 nuclear weapons to 1060 targets in the Soviet Union, China, and allied countries in Asia and Europe. Even with the end of the Cold War, because of the ongoing superpower nuclear arms race, Gen. Butler bitterly renounced the current nuclear programs/systems as a death warrant for the species.

Q: In his address at the National Press Club in February, 1998, Gen. Butler referred to “the grotesquely destructive war plans and daily operational risks” of our current nuclear systems, and emphasized “a world free of the threat of nuclear weapons is necessarily a world devoid of nuclear weapons.” He also referred to the “mind-numbing compression of decision-making under the threat of a nuclear attack.” Do you think these concerns are still valid today?

Chomsky: Yes, General Lee Butler recanted his whole career, and gave elegant speeches about the numbers of nuclear missiles devoted to nuclear deterrence being an abomination. Yes, the current nuclear dangers still remain quite high.

Q: During the Bush administration, in August of 2007, there was the unauthorized movement of nuclear bombs from Minot Air Force Base in North Dakota to Barksdale Air Force Base in Louisiana. Six AGM-129 Advanced Cruise Missiles (ACMs), each loaded with W80-1 nuclear warheads, were moved and left unprotected for 36 hours, violating the strict checks and balances of nuclear weapons storage. Investigations later concluded that the nuclear weapons handling standards and procedures had not been followed. Are these the kind of dangers you are referring to?

Chomsky: How dangerous the first alert system is remains only a tiny portion of the overall dangers. To understand more of the dangers of nuclear weapons, definitely read journalist Eric Schlosser’s book, “Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety.” (Eric Schlosser is National Security Correspondent for The Nation Magazine.) In his book, there are many details of near-accidents that have happened, and that could have been catastrophic. The possibilities of close calls due to human error were probably even worse on the Russian side. There have been many times we have been extremely near to having a nuclear war.

The U.S. has an automated response system with data coming in about possible missile attacks. However, it is still left to civilians to make the major decision to destroy the world, and usually with just a few minutes to make that decision. To launch a nuclear war is essentially in the hands of the president. We can’t survive something like that, and especially with so many other nuclear powers worldwide. With India and Pakistan, the same tensions can easily blow up in that region.

We also have to address these issues of unauthorized movement of nuclear bombs, and also the reality of simple human error. The record is hair-raising. There are very high standards worldwide that can’t be met, or aren’t being met, and there is too much room for human error. There have also been many circumstances where the authorization to launch missiles have been delegated to lower-level commanders. Even though there is a two-person requirement, if one does lose control and wants to destroy the world, then the fate of the world is the hands of the other person.

Q: The Obama administration is calling for a reduction of troops across the board (Army, Navy, Air Force, etc.), and emphasizes that the U.S. now has so much might and strength from U.S. missile technology, that we no longer need so many troops. What do you think of this?

Chomsky: A reduction to the amount in the world today? Well, the two major wars, the Bush wars, have been winding down so a lesser amount of troops are needed now. We are also letting go of numbers of troops that we needed to fight two wars simultaneously. We have the biggest military budget in the world, and it is equal to the rest of the world’s military budget combined. War-making is now being transferred to other domains, i.e., drone warfare, etc.

In The New York Times recently, there was a debate about whether the U.S. should murder [with drones] an American in Pakistan. In the article, there is no question raised about killing of non-Americans. These citizens in other countries are all apparently fair game. For example, if anyone is holding their cell phone that day, the drone can easily kill them. But when an action like that occurs, it immediately creates more terrorists. The irony is that while fighting terrorism, we are carrying out a version of a global terrorist campaign ourselves, and are also creating additional dangers for our own country.

So we are now utilizing a new form of warfare with the use of drones. Drones are assassinating people worldwide, without these people being proven guilty first in a court of law. They are just killed by a drone. Gone. Our president decides it.

In addition, with the reduction of numbers of overall troops, it still causes an increase of Special Forces operations on the ground. So what kind of operations are they doing now? Read Jeremy Scahill’s book, “Dirty Wars.” [Jeremy Scahill is National Security Correspondent for The Nation Magazine.] He points out how all of these operations are causing the United States to be the most feared country in the world.

Recently, there was an international poll conducted by a major polling organization in which they asked, “Which country is the greatest threat to world peace?” “The U.S.” was answered the most. The whole world sees us that way nowadays. Around the world, the U.S. is viewed as its own terrorist operation, and these actions create anger in other countries. It is becoming a self-generating system of terrorism itself (while fighting terrorism). Even if the U.S. reduces the number of soldiers needed for the invasion of other countries, we still continue to use drones now too. It creates a lot of anger worldwide against the U.S. when innocent citizens internationally are continually being killed, and/or no court of law is first ruling the suspected terrorists are guilty before being killed by the drones.

Q: A Russian armed intelligence-gathering vessel, the Victor Leonov SSV-175 Warship, conducted a surprise visit to Cuba on the same day Russia announced plans to expand their global military presence – establishing permanent bases in Cuba, Nicaragua, Vietnam, and Singapore. Amid the rising tensions with Putin over the Ukraine, do you think the U.S. could have another version of the Cuban Missile Crisis, or an escalation of war in the Ukraine, especially with NATO troop movement in Eastern Europe?

Chomsky: Ukraine is one issue right now that is very sensitive. Cuba is another target of US campaigns against it. The U.S. has conducted major, official governmental campaigns against Cuba, especially financial warfare, for fifty years. The former Cuban Missile Crisis was to deter an invasion of the U.S.

The sudden presence of a Russian ship in Cuba at the beginning of the Ukraine situation was probably a symbolic move. Russia is surrounded by U.S. military bases and nuclear missiles. We have one thousand military bases around the world with nuclear missiles aimed at all our potential enemies. The country of Ukraine is split right now: Western-oriented and Russian-oriented. It’s located on the Russian border, so there are major security issues for Putin. Ukraine has the only naval base leading to water (the Black Sea) in Crimea, so from Russia’s point of view, the Ukraine situation is a security threat to them, especially with NATO moving into Eastern Europe. If the Ukraine joins the EU, then Russia will have hostile relations at their border. Ukraine has historically been part of the Russian empire, so with the demands being made right now by the U.S., and Russia’s counter-demands, and with the presence of Russian troops, the clash might even blow up to a threat of a major war, which of course, could lead to a nuclear missile confrontation.

Q: Is nuclear disarmament really possible?

Chomsky: It is very possible to take away the nuclear threats to mankind and human survival. In the case of eliminating all nuclear weapons worldwide, it only takes everyone agreeing to do it. We know what can be done to eliminate the nuclear weapons threats to humankind. The U.S., like all nuclear nations, has an obligation of good faith efforts to eliminate nuclear weapons entirely.

However, with environmental catastrophes, it is not so obvious what the world must do to avoid the accumulative dangers. But one important measure of what to do is to realize that the longer we delay stopping the use of fossil fuels, the worse the worldwide environment will be that we are leaving to our grandchildren. They just won’t be able to deal with it later. However, with nuclear weapons, we can most definitely disarm, and we have a responsibility to do this.

Jane Ayers is an independent journalist (stringer with USA Today, Los Angeles Times, etc.), and Director of Jane Ayers Media. She can be reached atJaneAyersMedia@gmail.com or http://www.wix.com/ladywriterjane/janeayersmedia

 

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KPFA: Dr. Helen Caldicott threatened with death while in Japan for speaking about nuclear power — Students being charged with disturbing the peace for handing out flyers (AUDIO)

March 21, 2014

Latest Headlines from ENENews


KPFA: Dr. Helen Caldicott threatened with death while in Japan for speaking about nuclear power — Students being charged with disturbing the peace for handing out flyers (AUDIO)

Posted: 20 Mar 2014 12:41 PM PDT

Official: Radioactive material escaping everyday from WIPP and dispersing — Top officials “not made available for comment” — Expert: Leaks from ‘unfiltered’ ducts went on for weeks

Posted: 20 Mar 2014 10:31 AM PDT

Japanese TV: Fukushima fuel cores have ‘molten-through’ containment vessels — Location of molten fuels is unknown — “Risk of re-criticallity” from filling vessels with water

Posted: 20 Mar 2014 07:57 AM PDT

Thousands in Japan Protest Nuclear Power

March 17, 2014

Fukushima nuclear workers and their supporters shouts slogans as they raise their fists in front of the headquarters of Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), operator of the tsunami-battered Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, during a rally in Tokyo on March 14, 2014. (photo: Toru Yamanaka/AFP/Getty Images)
Fukushima nuclear workers and their supporters shouts slogans as they raise their fists in front of the headquarters of Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), operator of the tsunami-battered Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, during a rally in Tokyo on March 14, 2014. (photo: Toru Yamanaka/AFP/Getty Images)

go to original article

By Al Jazeera America and AFP

16 March 14

 

As regulators look to restart two reactors in southern Japan, workers at crippled Daiichi plant talk of dangers, low pay

housands of people in Tokyo have rallied against nuclear power as the government and utilities prepare to restart reactors in southern Japan.

More than 5,000 protesters gathered at Hibiya Park in Tokyo on Saturday to pressure the government not to restart the country’s nuclear power stations.

“Japan is prone to earthquakes. We have to seriously think about whether nuclear power is a good idea for Japan,” said protester Masatoshi Harada. “This is an opportunity for Japan to drop nuclear power.”

Regulators are currently reviewing whether to let Kyushu Electric Power restart two reactors at its Sendai power plant.

Saturday’s demonstration came days after the country marked the third anniversary of a 9.0-magnitude earthquake that struck northern Japan in March 2011.

The earthquake prompted a deadly tsunami along the northern Pacific coastline and huge waves swamped already damaged cooling systems at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, resulting in three reactor meltdowns and explosions that spewed radioactive materials into the vast, rural region.

The wrecked plant, which continues to vent radionuclides into the atmosphere and leak tens of thousands of gallons of contaminated water into the Pacific Ocean, is expected to take at least 40 years to stabilize. The surrounding area will show high levels of radioactive contamination for decades to come.

On Friday, nearly 100 workers who helped to clean up the crippled plant rallied outside the headquarters of Fukushima operator Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), complaining they were forced to work for meager pay in dangerous conditions

Workers also rallied outside Maeda Corp Friday, one of the contractors hired to clean up the plant and surrounding areas.

The earthquake and tsunami killed 15,884 people and left 2,633 people still missing.

Supporters of nuclear power, including the prime minister, Shinzo Abe, said Japan needs atomic energy to ensure the economic health of the world’s third largest economy.

But protesters at Saturday’s demonstration argued that the country can live without nuclear power as it has done for most of the last 36 months.

“Nuclear plants have been closed, so you cannot say we cannot live without nuclear energy,” anti-nuclear campaigner Junichi Okano said.

All of the nation’s roughly 50 commercial nuclear reactors have gradually been shut down since 2011 and remain offline due to unprecedented public opposition to restarting them.

Questions have continued to mount about the working conditions created by the web ofFukushima contractors and sub-contractors.

Several thousand employees at the plant are locked in a daily and dangerous scramble to keep the site from again spiraling out of control, making myriad repairs and building tanks for the vast amounts of water contaminated after being used to cool the fractured reactors.

Some demonstrators on Friday said they received far less pay than promised as various layers of bosses docked money for supplying meals, transportation and other expenses.

They also said many had not received a 10,000 yen daily premium ($98) for decontamination work.

“Workers at the Fukushima plant have been forced to do unreasonable tasks with no decent safety measures,” said one man in his 30s, who declined to give his name.

He said he was laid off after several months in the job due to heavy radiation exposure.

“Workers are forced to handle contaminated water in such grim working conditions, where any human being should not be put to work,” he said.

“They tend to make easy mistakes under the pressure, but it’s not they who are at fault — it’s the conditions that force them to do terrible tasks.”

Maeda Corp did not immediately respond to a request for comment about working conditions in the stricken area.

 

March 16, 2014

Thousands rally in Tokyo against nuclear power

NATIONAL MAR. 16, 2014 – 06:25AM JST ( 6 )

Thousands rally in Tokyo against nuclear powerBuddhist monks holding a banner saying “No more nuclear plants” walk past the TEPCO headquarters during a protest march in Tokyo on Saturday.AFP

TOKYO —

Thousands of campaigners rallied against nuclear power in Tokyo Saturday, as the government and utilities move toward resumption of reactors in southern Japan.

More than 5,000 protesters gathered at Hibiya Park in downtown Tokyo to urge the government not to restart nuclear plants, as regulators review whether to let Kyushu Electric Power to restart two reactors at its Sendai power plant.

“Japan is prone to earthquakes. We have to seriously think about whether nuclear power is a good idea for Japan,” said Masatoshi Harada, 60, as he joined fellow protesters at the park and later to march toward the Ginza shopping district.

“This is an opportunity for Japan to drop nuclear power,” he said.

Last week tens of thousands held a rally at the same site to voice fears about any reliance on nuclear power.

Saturday’s event came days after Japan marked the third anniversary of a 9.0-magnitude earthquake that struck northern Japan in March 11, 2011.

The quake prompted killer tsunami along the northern Pacific coastline.

The twin disasters killed 15,884 people and left 2,633 people still unaccounted for.

Huge waves swamped cooling systems of the Fukushima plant, which went through reactor meltdowns and explosions that spewed radioactive materials to the vast farm region.

No one died as a direct result of the nuclear accident, but at least 1,656 people died as a result of complications related to stress and other conditions while their lives in evacuation become extended.

Supporters of nuclear power, including Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, say Japan needs atomic energy to ensure the economic health of the world third largest economy.

But protesters argued that Japan can live without nuclear power as it has done so for many months.

All of the nation’s roughly 50 commercial nuclear reactors have remained offline due to tense public opposition to restarting them.

“Nuclear plants have been closed, so you cannot say we cannot live without nuclear energy,” anti-nuclear campaigner Junichi Okano said

© 2014 AFP

Buddhist monks holding a banner saying  A protester wears a

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